Search:

LID Tag

Finding Ways to Save on Stormwater Utility Fees

The intent of new stormwater utility fees being implemented by the City of Roanoke  is twofold: New Revenue Source - Stormwater utility fees will provide revenue to fund stormwater improvement projects. These projects are geared to correct past deficiencies (undersized conveyance systems and/or flooding problems) and/or to implement stormwater quality improvement projects throughout the City. These improvements are necessitated by the City’s  new municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) permit and the Virginia Stormwater Management Program regulations. Encourage Conservation Projects and Low Impact Development - Homeowners and businesses alike can implement best management practice (BMP) facilities on their property to mitigate the impact that development on their property has on local drainage areas and the entire watershed.. In an interview with Roanoke City engineer Phil Schirmer, he shares some of the ways that property owners can implement strategies to reduce their stormwater footprint and reduce the fee that they will pay to the City under new...

Continue Reading

Low Impact Design Examples on Display at Science Museum of Richmond

[caption id="attachment_886" align="alignleft" width="300"] Bioretention Area[/caption] As design professionals, many of us feel uneasy about the lack of data documenting stormwater BMPs performance. The data that is available shows a wide range of treatment efficiencies for the same types of BMPs and lacks completeness in documenting how design parameters, maintenance, and other conditions can affect performance. So it’s great to see that the Science Museum of Virginia, in cooperation with Virginia Tech and the City of Richmond, is pursuing several projects to expand the base of stormwater BMP knowledge. The Science Museum has installed the following: • two tree box filters • a bioretention area • a cistern • an area of permeable concrete • vegetated green roof [caption id="attachment_891" align="alignleft" width="300"] Tree Box Filter[/caption] These systems are equipped with instrumentation, including flow weirs and samplers to collect data. The projects are currently collecting data. If you are in the Richmond area, please visit the Science Museum and see...

Continue Reading

Putting the LID on Stormwater Runoff

The following post is provided by guest blogger Thomas Powers, P.E., LEED AP, CFM, CPESC, A Project Manager with Wight & Company in Chicago Illinois and former colleague of The Inlet's Carolyn Howard. [caption id="attachment_688" align="alignleft" width="234" caption="Thomas Powers, PE, LEED AP, CFM, CPESC"][/caption] How many gallons of rain do you think falls each year on just one acre of land in Norfolk, Va.? Ten thousand? One hundred thousand? Would you believe more than one million? Unfortunately, most of that water isn’t absorbed by the land and instead becomes stormwater runoff, carrying debris, chemicals, sediment or other pollutants. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ranks urban runoff and storm-sewer discharges as the fourth most prevalent source of impairment of our lakes, streams and rivers. The current best practices in stormwater management is called low impact development (LID), which refers to a comprehensive land planning and engineering design approach that emphasizes conservation and the use of...

Continue Reading