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Chesapeake Bay Foundation Tag

Grasses for the Masses

Glenn Telfer, Technical Leader for Sustainable Design in our Richmond office, is making a lasting, postive impact by taking part in the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s (CBF) Grasses for the Masses program. He is volunteering to grow aquatic grasses from seed and plant them in the Chesapeake Bay. Aquatic grasses are a vital part of the chain of life in the Bay. Also know as submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), they provide essential habitat and shelter for the young of many species, including crabs and fish. Without the shelter provided by thick grass beds in shallow waters near the shoreline, the young are exposed to predators. Glenn volunteered to be part of this program because it links with his expertise in stormwater design. “On every project, I design stormwater systems to reduce nutrient pollution into the Chesapeake Bay. Re-establishing the aquatic grass beds also helps to achieve the goal of a cleaner Bay.” Aquatic vegetation...

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Localities Propose Legislation to Delay Implementation of New Stormwater Programs

[caption id="attachment_1251" align="alignleft" width="230"] Photo Credit - Rex Springston/Times Dispatch[/caption] Though local stormwater programs have been debated for many years, a July 1, 2014 deadline for the implementation of new stormwater management programs to be administered by Virginia localities is the target of proposed legislation in the 2014 session of the General Assembly. Groups including the Virginia Association of Counties who represents Virginia’s 95 counties by unanimous vote of its membership in November voted to support a one-year delay, to July 2015. While localities argue that the timeframe to implement these new programs has been too tight to meet the 2014 deadline, groups including the Chesapeake Bay Foundation say that the time is now to act and that "We do not need to delay any more.” Both sides of the arguement recognize that stormwater programs should include a sustainable funding model. Relying solely on fees charged for new development exposes localities to revenue swings...

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CBF and City of Richmond Employ Innovative Approach to Urban Stormwater Runoff

[caption id="attachment_1236" align="alignleft" width="300"] Floating Wetlands located in Baltimore Harbor[/caption] To achieve the goals set forth in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) while minimizing costs, creativity and innovation will be key - launching floating wetlands in our waterways is just one piece to that puzzle.   The City of Richmond is working with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and the James River Association to identify and plan for cost-effective water quality treatment practices.   Read more about what the City of Richmond is doing to clean up the James and the Chesapeake Bay. http://www.timesdispatch.com/sports/recreation/hiking/outdoors-a-small-victory-in-the-battle-against-urban-runoff/article_276290b7-6745-59c7-911d-67e7293cac51.html [caption id="attachment_1238" align="alignleft" width="300"] Floating wetlands being prepared to "launch" at Bryan Park[/caption]...

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USDA – Conservation Measures Have Reduced Runoff to Chesapeake Bay

The agriculture industry's impact to water quality is very significant and the USDA has been doing its part to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay – to the tune of $650 million over the past 5 years.  This investment is paying off.   A recent study shows that there has been a reduction of phosphorous and nitrogen levels in the Bay since 2006.   These signs of improvement are encouraging, but there is still much that will need to be accomplished in order to re-establish the Bay’s ecosystem.   Read more about it from the Hampton Roads Pilot Online here. Additional news coverage of the announcemetn from NewsLeader.com...

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Urban Stormwater Runoff – It Is a Concern Even During Election Season

First order of business for today: Vote. Voting is our collective civic duty and responsibility. [caption id="attachment_924" align="alignleft" width="300"] Chimborazo Elementary School Rain Garden[/caption] Bacon's Rebellion is a one of Virginia's leading politically non-aligned portal for news, opinions and analysis about state, regional and local public policy, so some might find it surprising that over the weekend - just days before a national election in which Virginia could play a critical role in who occupies the White House - readers would learn more about a small rain garden installed by the City of Richmond earlier this summer at Chimborazo Elementary School. Truth is, the City of Richmond has probably been receiving  more negative publicity for it stormwater program as of late than it has for the improvements that the program was created to fund. Recent articles in the Richmond Times-Dispatch and other media have stated that collections for the City's stormwater utility fee have been poor...

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Creating More Green – Creating Less Stormwater

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="320"] The water coming down the restored branch of Donaldson Run on the left is visibly cleaner than the cloudy, silt-filled water flowing down the unrestored branch on the right.[/caption] Arlington County has implemented a number of strategies to capture, slow, treat, or otherwise reduce the stormwater runoff throughout the County. One technique being used by Arlington has been the use of low-impact, “greenscaping” techniques. These projects help Arlington to not only restore clean water to local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, but also reduce flooding, cut treatment costs, and beautify streets and public places. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation features Arlington County in the cover story of the Bay Daily. Read more at http://cbf.typepad.com/bay_daily/2012/10/arlington-more-green-less-stormwater.html...

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Northern Virginia Delegate to Sponsor Cleanup

[caption id="attachment_744" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Delegate Scott Surovell"][/caption] Virginia State Delegate Scott Surovell knows first-hand how pulluted and impaired some of the creeks, streams and rivers in the 44th District are. In fact, a recent report by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)  regarding Mount Vernon and Lee’s rivers and streams has prompted Delegate Surovell to sponsor a cleanup of Upper Little Hunting Creek in the area west of where it flows east  under Route 1. "I walked the creek last week in the creek I and saw hundreds of bottles and plastic bags, over 20 discarded shopping carts, two  mattresses, chairs, tables, a scooter and other trash." stated Delegate Surovell. In the EPA report and according to a Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s analysis, every embayment and stream monitored in the 44th District violated state water quality standards. Read more about the watershed conditions in the 44th District and how you can get involved with the...

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EPA to Virginia – “Refine Your Detailed Bay TMDL Plan…Or Else”

[caption id="attachment_696" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Shores of the James River"][/caption] It looks like the EPA will not be relinquishing their oversight of Virginia’s management of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL anytime soon. As noted in this Newsleader.com (Staunton, Virginia) article, the EPA returned Virginia’s plan for the clean-up of the Bay with harsh criticism, a deadline of March 30th for resubmittal, and threats of federal action if  "EPA requests are ignored or deadlines missed." We’ll keep you posted on how the Commonwealth is dealing with the latest requirements of the EPA. Are we on the right path to success? http://www.newsleader.com/article/20120224/NEWS01/202240311...

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